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Thirty Days Of Intent - Forgiving Yourself
Imagine the person you love most in your life, the person you pour your time and affection into. Think about all the energy and care you put into your relationship with this person, the mistakes you’ve forgiven, the flaws you’ve come to cherish. What a gift it is to love. And what a gift for that person to be loved by you.

Now consider this… Do you love yourself as completely and effortlessly as you love this other person? Imagine having that immense reservoir of attention and care on hand at all times, available to dip into whenever you need it. In the latest episode of 30 DAYS OF INTENT on The Chopra Well, Natalie and Iman meet with counselor Alyssa Nobriga for a lesson in self-forgiveness, perhaps one of the most powerful tools of self-care.

Many think self-love is just a form of narcissism, but the purest love knows no conceit. From a spiritual perspective, loving the self communicates humility and gratitude to whatever force gives us life. From a pragmatic perspective, studies show that self-forgiveness reduces procrastination, helps us break negative habits, and promotes personal growth.

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Self-Acceptance has definetly been a process for me. Being a former addict in my active addiction in addition to growing up in a dysfunctional family...it is all too easy to fall back into the old patterns and behaviors of self-loathing, worthlessness etc..Today I am learning to \"put the bat down\", and am a little less critical of myself and others. ie; Forgivness and Self-Acceptance go hand in hand for me. I had to first begin by allowing myself to \"feel\" my feelings, the good, bad and the ugly, which was very painful and definetly unfamiliar. By learning self-acceptance and forgiveness on a deep level resolves my need for perfection. I can list my assets today as well as my character defects. By Forgiving myself I can now forgive others, and I know from my own experience that harboring those resentments is slow, relentless torture. Besides the word itself says; \"resent me\"! Stay Blessed and go be that blessing one another. OneLove..jen (xnavygal)
xnavygal - February 4, 2014
I suffered greatly from self-condemnation until I had an encounter with my mother who had passed on to the other side. From her enlightened perspective out of the body, she taught me this: Self-condemnation is rooted in pride. It`s based on the idea \"I`m too good to have made that kind of mistake. Others can and do. But not me.\" When we accept that we are, like all people, learning to balance our human and spiritual natures and in the process we can make big and small errors, that we are not immune to this any more than anyone else, then this remorse has a chance of being transformed into compassion for oneself which produces a powerful determination to live according to one`s new, higher perception. For just as Pride leads to self-condemnation, humility leads to self-forgiveness. It also helps to remember that the greatest saint among us had at one time or another, in some lifetime, a transformation of his or her being where all things became clear, and any words or deeds less than noble were revealed to them in stark detail. Seeing our errors, feeling remorse, and forgiving ourselves as we would forgive another person, is part of that same process the most enlightened ones have undergone. In this way we are all ultimately no greater than any sinner or less than any saint. Read \"Transforming Resmorse\" in Book Three of the series \"The Team: A Mother`s Wisdom from the Other Side\" ... Peace to you... Frances
The Team Books - February 25, 2013
20 different people came out 20 different ways to make money using the
people who are weak. :) Nice, chopra is definitely well.
CNV NIRO - December 31, 2012
What I was thinking was does having some hurt help?For instance, something
adverse happens because you did not have a skill set. Following that, you
attempt to become a master on that skill set, and in doing so, you become
really good at what you once did not have. And this happened because of the
passion you had that came from that hurt. I wonder, is having that kind of
hurt helpful in becoming a better person?
Oli Ver - December 20, 2012
Or will the hurt simply compound, and magnify in the future to turn from a little cub into a dangerous tiger that will eat you up?\n\n\n
Oli Ver
- December 20, 2012
What I was thinking was does having some hurt help?For instance, something adverse happens because you did not have a skill set. Following that, you attempt to become a master on that skill set, and in doing so, you become really good at what you once did not have. And this happened because of the passion you had that came from that hurt. I wonder, is having that kind of hurt helpful in becoming a better person?\n\n\n
Oli Ver
- December 20, 2012
So glad you like the show!
The Chopra Well - December 17, 2012
So glad you like the show!\n\n\n
TheChopraWell
- December 17, 2012
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